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• Which line or description do you think is most effective? The gods are always avenging themselves and changing mortals into animals or plants so that they can prove their own superiority. • Paper 4.0 Aesthetic Valuing Landscape in Ovid's Metamorphoses A study in the transformations of a literary symbol. 2. Free, fun, and packed with easy-to-understand explanations! (He fashions some leaves from the tree in the form of a crown to wear upon his head to remember his love for Daphne.) The gods are always avenging themselves and changing mortals into animals or plants so that they can prove their own superiority. Part Two: Ekphrasis and Rilke's Poetry transformations in ovid’s metamorphoses [This list has been prepared by Ian Johnston, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada. • What does their body language suggest to you? 2. • compose poems using metaphor. The main theme in this epic is the theme of change and transformation, which is the center of most of the myths that are told in the epic. • Refer to Poetry and Music in Antiquity to evaluate how Apollo is portrayed in other tales. Have students listen for the figurative language employed by their peers. R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Storytelling joins the theme of transformation and the motif of art. Metamorphoses, poem in 15 books, written in Latin about 8 CE by Ovid. • interpret and compare literary and visual works of art. The theme is presented in the opening lines of the poem, where the poet invokes the gods who are responsible for the changes to look favorably on his efforts to compose. The theme is presented in the opening lines of the poem, where the poet invokes the gods who are responsible for the changes to look favorably on his efforts to compose. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. The tile of Ovid’s poem Metamorphoses literally translates to mean “transformation.” The compendium is actually itself a transformational work, merging a multitude of Greek and Roman historical traditions into one massive epic poem. • Which parts of the poem would benefit from further explanation or detail? Challenge them to take the reader through the experience from a description to an emotional, reflective, or philosophical impact. This epic involved many stories of different gods and different humans and their interactions. Where can you see this effect? With any translation there is a loss of meaning, whether in its words, rhythm, rhyme, or form. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. It does not include the changes which occur when gods disguise themselves as human individuals or as animals or temporarily alter their shape. • How does Apollo try to convince Daphne of his love? Challenge them to take the reader through the experience from a description to an emotional, reflective, or philosophical impact. Share with students that artists often interpret stories from the past in original works of art. Simultaneously, however, the nudity distances the deity from the mortal (clothed/cultured) experience, especially when the nude form suggests an idealized, immortal beauty. Metamorphoses Book 3: Pentheus and Bacchus. Common Core Standards for English Language Arts After students have written their first drafts, invite them to share their poems with partners first. (She prays to her father, a river god, that her purity remain intact and that her beauty be destroyed. • Have you ever been struck by something that you considered great but didn't have the words to describe? Permissions: The lesson plan and downloadable materials on this page are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. • Use simile and hyperbole to describe the experience. It is extremely rare to have a full history of any work of art, particularly fragments.) What is missing? It was written in epic metre but instead of focussing on a unified epic narrative, it collects together a large number of self-contained stories, including the tales of Daphne and Apollo, Diana and Actaeon, Daedalus and Icarus, Orpheus and Euridice, Achilles, Midas and many more. Three to four 50-minute class periods Landscape in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Inform your students that the poem was translated from German. Ovid takes stories relevant to his culture and time period, and weaves them together into one work with a connecting theme of transformation throughout. 5. • Reproduction of Apollo Crowning Himself by Antonio Canova Author: J. Paul Getty Museum Education Staff. The Homeric Iliad (c. 850 BC) soars to the literary heights of the sublime, and shows us how to live and die, to meditate on mortality, to embrace sorrow, to grip and then release hate, to truly love. (Use this question as an open summation for the experience of the work of art.) The work is a collection of mythological and legendary stories, many taken from Greek sources, in which transformation (metamorphosis) plays a role, however minor. • Refer to Poetry and Music in Antiquity to evaluate how Apollo is portrayed in other tales. Reading: Literature (One leg is engaged and the other is relaxed, suggesting an air of aloofness or distraction, perhaps dumbstruck by love; his hand holds the leaves of the laurel, making Daphne's presence tangible, even in the transformation.) Try to describe something by saying what it is like. 4.0 Aesthetic Valuing The Metamorphoses The Metamorphoses is Ovid's longest extant work, a continuous epic poem in fifteen books, consisting of nearly 12,000 lines. Hence, the focus shifts from the action of the story to the content of the character. 1. (Point out that the speaker uses simile ["eyes like ripening fruit; "torso...like a lamp"] and hyperbole ["suffused with brilliance from inside"].) Lesson Overview. Then ask for volunteers to take turns reading each paragraph aloud. Lesson Overview. Ask students if they can think of a film that is inspired by Greek or Roman mythology. Nudity in art was reserved for mythological subjects, with the gods and goddesses nude as compared to clothed humanity. • Reproduction of Young Man by an unknown artist ‘I intend to speak of forms changed into new entities.’ Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Grades 9–12 Metamorphoses or Transformations refers to the change of shape and form of the characters of the poem. 1. (The arrow transformed the usually sober character of Apollo into a lustful pursuant of the chaste nymph. The emotion seemingly turns inward—stoic and reserved—rather than manifesting itself in an outward expression of loss.) It is usually the cause of whatever transformation the stories are explaining. After students have written their first drafts, invite them to share their poems with partners first. • Consider the sculpture you saw before (Antonio Canova's Apollo Crowning Himself). The emotion seemingly turns inward—stoic and reserved—rather than manifesting itself in an outward expression of loss.) Popular examples include Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando: A Biography. Ultimately, she is transformed into a laurel tree.) Part One: Apollo and Daphne “Metamorphoses” is often called a mock-epic, as it is written in dactylic hexameter (the form of the great epic poems of the ancient tradition, such as “The Iliad”, “The Odyssey” and “The Aeneid”), unlike Ovid‘s other works. Pentheus was a skeptical man who doubted Tiresias' prophecies, so when the blind man foretold that Pentheus would disrespect the power of Bacchus as a god and be ripped apart by the hands of his own mother and sisters for his faithlessness, Pentheus didn't believe him.. 1. Writing SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. His encyclopedic poem, The Metamorphoses, follows a narrative thread from the creation of the Earth to the transformation of Caesar into a god. (Both are carved from stone, both are male subjects; one is divine, the other is human; one is nude, the other is clothed [see part 1, step 6, to review heroic nudity].) In part two, students read an ekphrastic poem by Rainer Maria Rilke and study a related work of art. Metamorphoses or Transformations refers to the change of shape and form of the characters of the poem. • Diagonal lines suggest movement and drama. Open a discussion with your students by suggesting that sculptural art often presents characters isolated from the narrative context or setting. Distribute copies of "Daphne and Phoebus" to your students. The Odyssey (c. 800 BC) takes us on an epic voyage f… But for some, the Metamorphoses sits uneasily alongside its more morally and patriotically sound predecessors. That includes personal love or as the personified deity, Amor/Cupid. Open a discussion about the poem by asking students the following: (The hair, like leaves, hides the face; arms like branches; feet like roots; the abdomen, the trunk, etc.) (Wanting to teach the pompous god a lesson, the mischievous Cupid shot two arrows at the unsuspecting Apollo and the mortal Daphne. 5. There are calls for Ovid's Metamorphoses to be taught with a trigger warning. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. Reading: Literature Subjects: Visual Arts, English–Language Arts The theme of the Metamorphoses is change and transformation, as illustrated in Graeco-Roman myth and legend. His lovelorn attempts include listing his admirable qualities, including his divine strengths and heritage.) Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. (At times the names Helios and Sol were also used to refer to his stewardship of the sun.) Where can you see this effect? This 15-book epic is a rollercoaster of a read, with moments of both delicious joy and abject depravity. The Metamorphoses continues to be retold through several media – in film, drama, opera, art, sculpture and so on. For more information on sonnets, visit Modern sculptors imagined the pristine white as "classic" for their "Neoclassical" artworks, when in fact ancient sculptures more often were colorfully painted. • What is Apollo's solution to his loss of love? Theme of Revenge in Metamorphoses Revenge is a recurring theme in the book Metamorphoses. Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15814) That includes personal love or as the personified deity, Amor/Cupid. "Metamorphoses" means transformations, and transformation is the governming theme of the text. ‘I intend to speak of forms changed into new entities.’ (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) That the gods are shown in the nude (natural) human form has paradoxical consequences. RL.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. • read and analyze ancient and modern texts. Then ask for volunteers to take turns reading each stanza aloud. 4. Allow them time to read the story once quietly. These themes, and others, Ovid explores throughout the Metamorphoses, doing his best to uncover every possible scenario for each trope. • Discuss another example of transformation from ancient mythology—the tale of Queen Niobe, who wept so much that Zeus turned her into stone. A study in the transformations of a literary symbol by Segal, Charles, 1936-Publication date 1969 (Wanting to teach the pompous god a lesson, the mischievous Cupid shot two arrows at the unsuspecting Apollo and the mortal Daphne. Inform students that the god Apollo was called by different names, depending on which role or duty he was fulfilling in a story. This line establishes one of the main themes of the poem, transformation, and links it to the gods. R.CCR.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. It is usually the cause of whatever transformation the stories are explaining. (A speaker expresses his thoughts while experiencing a fragment of an ancient sculpture. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. Daphne, already known for her chastity, becomes all the more revolted by the lust directed at her.) http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15814) Lewis famously pointed out in The Allegory of Love (1936), our current, predominantly romantic notions of love were "invented" in the Middle Ages. Cupid is mischievous, and proves tricky in his ability to transform the god into a love-crazed fool. Read the original German text in the article "And Yet Another Archaic Torso—Why?" Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid's Metamorphoses. In part two, students read an ekphrastic poem by Rainer Maria Rilke and study a related work of art. Grades 9–12 themes, motifs symbols themes the pervasiveness of metamorphoses as its title suggests, metamorphoses is an exploration of transformations of all kinds, from Suggest to your students that fragments present scholars with an interesting set of problems. The Pervasiveness of Metamorphoses. Unquestionably, the major theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses is transformations. • Copies of "Daphne and Phoebus" (Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book 1, lines 452—566) (available on the Theoi E-Texts Library Web site at http://www.theoi.com/Text/OvidMetamorphoses1.html#6) In Roman stories, he commonly was called Phoebus when referring to his role as the god of light. Who made it? Writing • What part of the story does the artist draw in this image? Ovid begins by addressing the gods and asking them to bless his undertaking. • How did Daphne escape his pursuit? Open a discussion with students about the drawing, using the following questions: Part Two: Ekphrasis and Rilke's Poetry His lovelorn attempts include listing his admirable qualities, including his divine strengths and heritage.) Extension Speaking and Listening 37. Next, ask them if they have a favorite story that was made into a movie. Have students consider the following: • What part of the story does the artist draw in this image? This type of poem may open with one idea—an argument—that may come to resolution by the end, a traditional transformation in sonnets. R.CCR.10. 37. Throughout the story, he takes beliefs that were significant at the time, and mocks them through the theme of transformation. The popularity and timelessness of this work stems from the manner of story telling. RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). W.CCR.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Display an image of Antonio Canova's Apollo Crowning Himself. They then write an original poem that explores the theme of transformation. • Diagonal lines suggest movement and drama. What questions might a scholar want to ask if he or she discovered a fragment? For more information on sonnets, visit Stories from ancient Greece and Rome have been interpreted and reinterpreted for centuries. • What do you think draws someone's attention to a fragmentary work of art (e.g., curiosity of what is unknown, space for the imagination, a barometer of time and loss)? Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. The Metamorphoses (Latin: Metamorphōseōn librī: "Books of Transformations") is an 8 AD Latin narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid, considered his magnum opus.Comprising 11,995 lines, 15 books and over 250 myths, the poem chronicles the history of the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Caesar within a loose mythico-historical framework. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Metamorphoses and what it means. 4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context, The Theme of Transformation in Poetry: Ovid's Metamorphoses, Exploring Art of the Ancient World at the Getty Villa, Assessing Online Resources for K-12 Teachers, Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, http://www.theoi.com/Text/OvidMetamorphoses1.html#6, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15814, http://jacketmagazine.com/36/beck-rilke-torso.shtml, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5791.

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